Ten tips on style for men from Patrick Hellmann

Photo c/o Patrick Hellmann Collection

Photo c/o Patrick Hellmann Collection

  1. POWER DRESS – Whether it’s for a life-changing meeting, job interview or a business trip, the classic combination of a dark, solid or slightly pinstriped suit with a bold-coloured tie is the cornerstone of every man’s power wardrobe. Though teaming a dark suit with a classic white shirt allows you to choose almost any tie pairing short of one with bright yellow polka dots, a traditional yet impeccably cut deep-red tie has been a go-to “power” look since John Kennedy wore the pairing in his first presidential debate.
  2. FIND THE SMART CASUAL BALANCE – Smart or business casual has become a buzzword that dictates anything from work wear to dinner dates; the balancing act between the smart-casual divide is what can make this particular mode of attire an uphill battle. The trick to nailing smart or business casual is to take your lead from the first word of this dress code. In terms of the finished look, you are ultimately going to be leaning to the smarter side of the spectrum so tuck in that shirt and shine those shoes.
  3. GET THE PERFECT SUIT FIT – Your flat hand should slip easily into your suit under the lapels when the top (or middle) button is fastened. If you put a fist in, the suit should pull at the button. The top button of a two-button suit (or the middle button of a three-button suit) should not fall below your navel. With your arms at your sides, your knuckles should be even with the bottom of your jacket and your jacket sleeves should fall where the base of your thumb meets your wrist. Between a quarter and a half inch of shirt cuff should be visible. The trousers should have one inch of break at the bottom.
  4. MATCH SUITS AND TIES – A suit with a solid base of dark colours is the safest way to emphasize solid, bold-coloured ties. Pattern sizes (stripes, etc.) on your suit, shirt and tie need to vary — nothing looks less chic than a man who is wearing the same pattern on every layer.
  5. MIX AND MATCH SHIRTS AND TIES – Light tan shirts match with brown ties whilst light pink shirts match with burgundy or navy blue ties. Light blue shirts complement red, navy, yellow or burgundy ties. When dealing with striped shirts, determine what its base colour is and coordinate with colours as above. Just make sure the stripes on the shirt do match the stripes or pattern on the tie. If you don’t know what shirt to wear, choose a white one.
  6. EMBRACE COLOUR AND TEXTURE – My colour is violet, it reminds me of my childhood and the gardens of La Mamounia in Morocco. You’ll find purple mainstays throughout my collections – from cashmere sweaters to vases. I think being bold with colour adds playfulness to an outfit and a room alike. Similarly, experiment with textures and interesting fabrics – you’ll find a mix of mink, beaver fur, leather and tweed in my collections.
  7. BE WELL HEELED – Great style is about attention to detail, so don’t overlook your shoes! A pair that is classic and well-crafted will finish off an outfit and bring confidence to the wearer through comfort. The Patrick Hellmann Oxford, for example, counts as the most elegant model of all men’s shoes. I reinterpreted the celebrated 1830 English classic with a modern mix of colours and their comfortable fit make these shoes a favourite in my men’s collection.
  8. ACCESSORISE – A hat or a scarf can really make an outfit. Pocket squares are a great accompaniment to a jacket – or wrap some cashmere scarf around your neck for some smart extravagance. Just remember to remove your hat when you are indoors or in the presence of ladies!
  9. FIND A DISTINCTIVE SCENT – Try the Patrick Hellmann ‘Signature’ fragrance, which we created in collaboration with Lalique, which comes with a beautifully crafted phoenix head crystal flacon.
  10. REMEMBER – Life is too short to be dressed badly!

Ten tips on skin care by Donna Glazer

  1. DO NOT USE FACIAL WIPES – Their high content of preservatives and perfumes will harm your skin.
  2. DO NOT ASSUME THE SKIN GETS DIRTY – Dirt particles are too large to absorb into the skin and just sit on the surface. A harsh cleanser isn’t necessary, just a gentle cleanser to remove the top layer of grime should suffice.
  3. KEEP EXFOLIATION SESSIONS TO ONCE A WEEK – Scrubbing should be avoided as harsh scrubs remove the skin’s natural oils and can harm the skin in the long run.
  4. AVOID PICKING SPOTS – A spot takes on average 7 days to heal whereas a wound takes up to 28 days.
  5. LESS IS ALWAYS MORE – Do not over load the skin with too many products at risk of reaction.
  6. USE A GENTLE CLEANSER – To remove any make up, grease and grime at the end of the day.
  7. BE SUN SAFE BUT NOT SUN PHOBIC – Vitamin D from the sun is essential for skin and general body health.
  8. MASSAGE YOUR SKIN BEFORE BED – Incorporate a gentle face massage into your skin regime before you go to sleep. This will ease away tension and boost circulation to reveal a relaxed and bright complexion in the morning.
  9. LOAD UP ON VITAMINS – Include high quality vitamins and antioxidants in your skin care regime both orally and topically. Vitamins A , C, D and E are essential as well as omegas 3 and 6, which the body doesn’t produce.
  10. INTRODUCE “PRODUCT COCKTAILING” – Some great ingredients and beauty products work better as a pair rather than by themselves. Take the Dermaviduals Liposome Concentrate Plus, usually prescribed for blemished skin, when combined with Echinacea Extract it can also treat rosacea.

Ten tips for painting food by Anna Koska

  1. GO AND FIND THE REAL THING – There are limits to this of course. In the case of some obscure fish, I’m not often in a position to don a wetsuit and jump in the deep if it lives at the bottom of the inky blue, but there’s always a fish market.
  2. HANDLE THE THING – If it’s got bones, feel where they lie. If it’s got skin, get familiar with the feel and texture: hairy, bald, feathery, scaly, bit gooey, slippery, a bit want-to-put-it-down-and-run. Move it around. Check out the way the shadows play on the dips and curves.
  3. TAKE IT HOME TO MEET THE FAMILY – If I can buy it and fit it in the car then I will bring it back home. There I can do sketches, take stock photos of proportions, detail and colours.
  4. COLOURS CAN FADE – Photos are important for colour reference. Your photos, not stock ones from a website. Stock photos can help, but the liberal pressing of the “enhance” button by some keen photo editor usually results in a distorted colour range! There are exceptions: Brussel sprouts really are flouro-green.
  5. YOU NEED A FREEZER – Chest ones are best. In amongst joints of unlabelled (they fell off) beasties, I have a few whole and named beasties including the odd gurnard and mackerel. When I’m illustrating fish, or indeed anything that once walked, swam or pranced, I tend to pop them, bagged, in the freezer. I can then haul them out to check the odd detail if necessary. (Extra tip: make sure you keep your feet on the ground when bending over into the chest freezer…)
  6. PERFUME IS IMPORTANT – Choose one you can stomach at close proximity. My current favourite is Penhaligons Blenheim Bouquet. Anything zingy is good. This is used to spray the thing that once walked, swam, pranced. It stops the studio smelling like an A level Biology lab during dissection practice.
  7. EXPERIENCE THE FOOD – You’ve got to have eaten the thing you’re illustrating. Obviously. You can’t expect to portray this as an edible, lustworthy food if you’ve no sense of the taste, texture and soul of the food.
  8. KEEP YOUR DISTANCE – Keep ‘helpful’ people (not just children)/waggling paintbrushes/colour felt tips/food dipped appendages, at a distance.
  9. TALKING OF HANDS – During my probationary period of illustrating I recall many traumatic moments trying remove beautifully immaculate hand profile prints concocted with a fabulous array of mixed media, including fish scales, lead pencil, water colour, with the occasional smear of Maltesers crumbs to add texture. Through excessive hand washing I now enjoy hands of a 70 year old, but it was worth it.
  10. REWARDS – There has to be rewards. This is a small selection of what makes me very happy: fresh figs, salted caramels, Chase Marmalade Vodka, my bicycle.

Ten tips on interior design from Linda Plant

Linda Plant at home (shot by Rich Hendry)

Linda Plant at home (shot by Rich Hendry)

  1. KEEP IT SIMPLE, MAKE IT INTERESTING – Don’t clutter. Mix traditional and modern; for example, a modern piece of art looks great in a classical setting. Don’t be afraid of bold colour and bold texture.
  2. SIZE MATTERS – Say goodbye to lots of little bits of furniture and hello to a couple of larger scale choice pieces.
  3. ACCESSORISE – The one accessory I couldn’t live without is white flowers – they bring life to a space. If in doubt, add white orchids – it never fails. I also love using groups of objects of different sizes as it creates interest.
  4. WALLS AND CEILINGS – Art is a must for creating interest and glamour. I like single large pieces but I also love the use of sets or collages. I always use a mix of framed and unframed, prints and oils. And remember, ceilings don’t have to be white.
  5. TEXTURE CONTRAST – I use texture everywhere. I often line my drapes in a contrasting fabric and use scatter cushions to transform a sofa armchair or a bed. I love wallpaper too because it adds warmth and interest. I just did a reception room where the main walls were a white textured paper and the chimney breast was a dark chocolate brown crocodile textured paper – the contrast looked sensational. Don’t forget the floor: if you have hard floors you have got to have amazing rugs. I mix super silky rugs with cheaper textured ones to make a visual impact.
  6. STORAGE, RETHINK IT – I like to transform a space to make it both decorative and useful; I recently turned a pair of alcoves into fabulous dark wood wine storage units. Try making a shelf into a feature too: a big criss-cross book shelf in a room can transform the room and become the centrepiece.
  7. MANTLE SHELVING – I love using these and extending them where possible. They are great areas for display and creating visual balance.
  8. MIRRORS – The simplest of all design solutions. I use them everywhere in every way: reflecting light, showing colours and small spaces in an interesting way. They are one of the least expensive ways of making magic and I couldn’t live without them.
  9. FIRE AND FIREPLACE – Add a fire where you can. Many fireplace companies are now making portable ones and you can use them as space dividers. They give a focal point to a room and a lovely glow on a winter’s day.
  10. FABULOUS LIGHTING – Whether it’s a chandelier or a super big shade, don’t skimp on it. Use a combination of floor lamps, table lamps, focal point ceiling and wall lights. And don’t forget candles.